Led Zeppelin Led Steps in the Right Direction

An explanation of my emotional experience with music

 

School of Rock is the single greatest movie of all time

It encapsulates a concept that is too scarcely spoken of

Oh, and yes, this poem will rhyme

It presents us with a story of love, but not just any love

 

This 2003 box office hit taught us how to love Rock n roll

And how to stick it to the man

But a second hand experience is not quite full.

So stick around “with rock in your heart and a guitar in your hand”

 

In 2nd grade I moved schools

I remember sitting down in the lunchroom on the first day amongst a flood of Green Day shirts

And thinking… cool?

What day was green?

and why was everyone so obsessed with it?

Later I found out Green Day was a who; I mean not THE Who but a who.

 

When I was a kid instead of life lessons I got music lessons

Never how to play music 

But how to listen to music 

And what music to listen to 

 

Windows down in the car, radio at full blast

Warm day outside, big boom box in an open garage

No shirt, no shoes, Neil Pert, deep blues

 

The godfather of punk or soul or something wise; the king of pop, or rock or some smooth Ol' blue eyes; and, of course, just The Boss.

Whether young or old, air guitar was never any time lost.

 

But wait, right here. This is where the divide came

My dad moved out; the person who taught my brothers and I everything there was to know about anything about music.

Having seen it coming for years, my brothers and I weren’t surprised

But that doesn’t mean at all that it didn’t change our lives

 

Good music was my families life blood.

So, It's amazing that after 6 years of no longer being a full family

We all still jam to Brown Sugar "like a young girl should"

 

But what the ruins left was a collection and love for vinyl 

And a mindset that final wasn't always final

I'll still Fly Like an Eagle and run like Wild Horses

Because I guess The Kids Are Alright

And I'll always know what music does: what its force is

 

Spoken WordKeaton Goodman